News from Roland Wicksteed for April 2017

  • New gates for Cockshott.

    15:28 20 April 2017
    By Roland Wicksteed, Dave Jackson, Dave Almond, James Archer, Neil Winder, Ben Knipe

    Cockshott Point, at the southern end of Bowness-on-Windermere is an extremely popular lake-side walk along the east side of Windermere, overlooking Claife Heights and Belle Isle.
    The old gates, giving access to Cockshott...above and below, are inadequate for some modern mobility scooters
    To allow better access for mobility scooters the old gates have recently been removed and replaced by purpose built mobility access gates.....
    Getting started at the southern end of Cockshott after dismantling and removing the old gates and railings.
    Concreting the gate post in.
     To the left a trench has been dug to allow the mobility access gate to be installed next to the new vehicular access gate.
    A close up of the self closing mechanism for the mobility access gate.
    The new gates. The 10' gate is locked and is only to be used by vehicles requiring access for events on Cockshott or for maintenance purposes.
    Work starting at the northern entrance.
    Digging out for the framework of the mobility access gate.
    The new gates and the recently resurfaced path have contributed towards making a big improvement at Cockshott.

    Below are some views from Cockshott Point now more easily accessible for everyone.
    A view of the Belle Isle Round House from Cockshott Point.
    Belle Isle with Claife Heights in the background. This wooded              area is renowned  for its variety of native tree species.             
          Looking north towards the Troutbeck Fells.
    An elegant steam yacht from a bygone era.

News from Roland Wicksteed

Photo of Roland Wicksteed

Ranger. It is a privilege to live and work in this beautiful area; it is unique. I am based at Windermere and Troutbeck. My favourite work is drystone walling and hedgelaying. I enjoy instructing Working Holiday Groups in both of these traditional crafts. Part of my work involves keeping the numbers of "invasive non native species" down as much as possible. I also continue to work on a project, the aim of which is to increase the numbers of the scarce touch me not balsam plants,(yellow flowering plants in the image's background!) which the rare netted carpet moth depends upon for its survival. The numbers of moths and plants are mainly restricted to a few small sites in The Lake District.

Blog:
http://centralandeastlakesrangers.blogspot.co.uk/