News from Paul Kear for December 2012

  • At Xmas time...

    10:00 21 December 2012
    By Clair Payne, Craig Hutchinson, Glenn Bailey, Ian Griffiths, John Atkinson, John Moffat, Luke Sherwen, Matthew Allmark, Nick Petrie, Paul Kear , Richard Tanner, Rob Clarke, Sam Stalker, Sarah Anderson, Stuart Graham

    Our blog this year has given us
    A chance to show what's what
    Explain the work we get to do
    What makes up a 'ranger's lot'

    One day it's making broomsticks
    The next day fixing paths
    Yes, work can be quite varied
    As a ranger on our patch

    The tale of the cave piano
    We helped make disappear
    Has been the most-read story
    On our rangers' blog this year
     
    Our posts have given an insight
    Into tasks that we have done
    Like our work at Wray Castle
    Kids (and us) have had some fun
     
    Now we're well into December
    And the year is nearly past
    The heartfelt  message of this post?
    "Merry Xmas - have a blast!"


    post by Linda (with apologies for the bad rhymes!)

  • A Memorable Year

    10:00 14 December 2012
    By Clair Payne, Craig Hutchinson, Glenn Bailey, Ian Griffiths, John Atkinson, John Moffat, Luke Sherwen, Matthew Allmark, Nick Petrie, Paul Kear , Richard Tanner, Rob Clarke, Sam Stalker, Sarah Anderson, Stuart Graham

    The other day I was looking through some old photos of family holidays in the Lakes and I still can't quite believe that 25ish years later I'm living and working here. 
    I have been here just over a year getting to grips with the place, meeting colleges, tenants and visitors and looking round my 'patch'.  The variety of the Trusts work in the South Lakes still surprises me from Castles to conservation, visitors to view's there's a bit of everything.


    Storms over the Old Man

    Its been a memorable year so for this blog I thought I would post a selection of pictures of my year.  There are a mix, some were taken at work, some are my own pictures.  I'll leave you to decide which is which!

      Dawn above Langdale.


    Meeting the locals Little Langdale.



    Harebells on the spoil heaps Little Langdale.


    Trusty sidekick snoozing through sunrise on Blencathra.


    Sunlight on Yew berries East Coniston woodland.




    Autumn colour South Lakes woodland.



    Clearing fallen oak trees Far Sawrey.




    

     Richard Tanner
    Ranger - Woodlands
  • International Mountain Day- Celebrating Mountain Life

    10:04 07 December 2012
    By Clair Payne, Craig Hutchinson, Glenn Bailey, Ian Griffiths, John Atkinson, John Moffat, Luke Sherwen, Matthew Allmark, Nick Petrie, Paul Kear , Richard Tanner, Rob Clarke, Sam Stalker, Sarah Anderson, Stuart Graham


    Sunset over the Langdales
    As an Upland Ranger I love being out and about in the Lake District Mountains.  Whether it’s for work or play they offer us green spaces full of challenge and nature.  Yet sometimes it is easily forgotten how important mountainous areas are to sustainable development on a global scale.   

    The 'Office'!
    Mountains cover 27% of the earth’s land area, with 17% of the worlds population (that’s 1.2 BILLION people) living in a mountainous region or on the fringes.  United Nations (2012) estimates they provide 60-80% of the world’s freshwater resource, which will include providing a water supply for at least half the worlds population, including for cities such as New York.  Closer to home, the Lake District is the water supply for Manchester.  They also provides us with the most important source of green energy, with hydro electricity contributing 20% of global electricity generation.

    Haweswater Reservoir
    Upland areas are also held in high regard by the people that lived in them.  For example the stone taken from the higher Langdale axe factories was considered more valuble than that taken from lower areas and mountain tops have always been considered as spiritual places.  The fact that Everest is known as the 'Holy Mother' and worshiped, futher supports this importance to the locals.  Even today people retreat into the mountains for peace and solitude. 

    Peace and quiet in our Stake Pass shed
    When looked at in this way mountainous areas are incredibly important to sustainable development on not just a global scale, but also a local scale.  They are also important indicators of global climate and potential change.  In making 11th December International Mountain Day the UN are acknowledging and raising awareness of the importance of mountains.  They believe that governments need to lead the way on ensuring these regions are managed in a holistic way, with water, biodiversity, tourism and infrastructure all taken into account, but also ensuring the local communities are at the core of any legislation.  

    Local communities are key to sustainable development
    In the UK a great example of this is the proposed management for the High Peak Moors.  By creating a draft management plan in conjunction with all the land owners, the National Trust aims to manage the area in a sustainable way that will not only benefit the upland areas but also have postive effects on areas lower down in the catchment.

    Sustainable management of the uplands has positive effects for the lowlands
    So what can we do?  Well getting out there and enjoying the mountains in a responsible manner is a good start!  Then being aware of the issues the UN are trying to raise is another, think about where your water supply comes from, how the weather locally could be affected by the mountains, the amount of carbon stored in upland bogs...we are all linked to the mountains in some way so lets appreciate them!

    Final picture is from John Atkinson, it's one of his favourites!  The weekend looks like it's going to be a good one, so get out and enjoy!

    Fleetwith Pike
    By Sarah Anderson- Ranger (Uplands)


     

News from Paul Kear

Photo of Paul Kear

Fueled by a passion for the fells of Lakeland I moved here in 1991, and became a Volunteer with the National Trust before being lucky enough to join the Upland Ranger team eventually becoming a supervisor until 2001. I then became the Ranger Volunteers, managing the busy volunteer residential centre near Hawkshead, where I had the pleasure of working with many different groups from diverse audiences in practical conservation tasks. In 2010 I moved into my current role of Volunteer Development Manager and since March 2014 am the Countryside Manager in the South Lakes. I have a keen interest in the human & physical geography and spend a lot of time in the fells, walking, running, climbing and camping.

Blog:
http://www.countryside-catchup.blogspot.co.uk/